Fish Health - Blanket Weed Treatments

Health main page

F.A.Q.
Checklist

Aeration
Aeromonas Hydrophila
Ammonia Test Errors
Anaesthetics
Anchor Worm
Bacterial Additives
Blanket Weed
Carp Pox
Cat Damage
Costia (killer)
Columnaris
Common Myths
Cryptobia
Dermocystidium
Dropsy
Dystocia
(Egg Compaction)

Fat Fish
Fish Louse
Foam
Food/Feeding
Furunculosis
Gill Bleeding
Gill Disease
Gill Maggots
Goldfish Ulcers
Hexamita
Leeches
Lymphocystis
Mechanical Fish
Mechanical Injury
Microscope page
Milky Skin
Mouth Cancer
Myxozoa
My Fish Jumped
Neon Tetra Disease
Ozone
pH Crash
Popeye
Post Mortems
Quarantine
Salt
Sepsis
Skin Cancer
Spawning
Sturgeon
SupaVerm
Surgery
Swim Bladder
Tapeworm
Tonic Salt
Tuberculosis
Tumours
Ulcers
Vitamin C
Water Filters
Water Fungus
White Spot


These products are sold in tubs and when added to a pond, cause the water to go a whitish colour as though you had added flour to your water.

The substance sticks to all surfaces.

Aha! - so you have used one of these! Have you lost any fish? Or perhaps the fish behaved very funny, hanging around waterfalls and filter outlets, giving the impression there is no oxygen. Your sturgeon roll over on their backs and gasp for air.

The reason for this message this summer is that I have had far too many phone calls and emails concerning ponds that have been fine until one of these products has been used, and then the system goes into free fall.

Most clients say "yes blanket weed is going and my water looks terrible and I am losing fish as though they are starved of oxygen".

The problem is I think, these products do not suit all systems. They seem to be more of a problem in new or mature systems and they seem to work better in systems under a year old and newer than 3 months, planted or not - which is a very small window.

They seem to work by choking the blanket weed, as some of these can be seen stuck to the pond sides 3-4 weeks after use.

I have not run any trials on these products, because I have not found a pond void of fish but full of blanket weed

The problem with blanket weed is most species ( of which I know of six) grow better in well stocked systems as it receives more nutrients.

The water quality problems, ammonia and nitrite, seem to suffer worst when K1 is the main media (it sticks together).

One of my clients who was unable to contact me (I was on holiday) removed his fish into a support pond and then treated his system. Once all the blanket weed had gone - about 28 days - and the water quality had returned he then returned his fish and suffered no losses. He tried two types of these products. The first did not work at all. This procedure he used is my best advice, because some of these products do work well with fish well. So it's up to you.

I have been told that in some ponds they all work well. All I can suggest is to add the recommended amount to five gallon of your pond water in a separate tub with an air stone, and see how it reacts with your water parameters.

Remember your biggest enemy with blanket weed is using tap water without out any water treatment, and I don't mean declor.